Christian religion – Hardy Presbyterian http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 02:41:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Christian religion – Hardy Presbyterian http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/ 32 32 religion in the state of Iowa: Adventist Christian brotherhood | New http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/22/religion-in-the-state-of-iowa-adventist-christian-brotherhood-new/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 02:41:46 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/22/religion-in-the-state-of-iowa-adventist-christian-brotherhood-new/ Iowa State students can join ACF by visiting Iowa State Student Organizations Web page. Courtesy of the Adventist Christian Fellowship webpage According to Jedidiah Chukwusom, president of the Adventist Christian Fellowship, for community members in the State of Iowa who wish to connect with Christ and bond with others who share their beliefs, ACF is […]]]>






Iowa State students can join ACF by visiting Iowa State Student Organizations Web page.




According to Jedidiah Chukwusom, president of the Adventist Christian Fellowship, for community members in the State of Iowa who wish to connect with Christ and bond with others who share their beliefs, ACF is a student organization. which offers this opportunity to its members.

According to the constitution of the Adventist Christian community, this organization was created to provide Christian students and friends with a place where they feel comfortable, accepted and valued without discrimination.

President Jedidiah Chukwusom, a senior in chemical engineering, leads and organizes meetings and events, maintains communication between members and the advisor, represents the organization on campus, and ensures that state standards of l ‘Iowa and the Student Activities Center are respected. Other officers alongside him are Treasurer Hyun Seon Kim and Councilor Mona Berkley.

Typically, officers and councilors are elected by majority agreement of members and serve for one year, but this year was different. Chukwusom stepped in to support and help build the organization when needed.

“I really didn’t decide I wanted the job, it was more of a necessity for the organization,” said Chukwusom. “Prior to becoming president, ACF was not a recognized student organization in the state of Iowa. In order to develop the organization, the faculty advisor approached me to be interim president. I chose to do so to help ACF grow and have since remained president to continue to foster that growth. ”

Meetings are held on the first Friday of each month at the Ames Seventh-day Adventist Church from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. To begin the meeting, a meal is prepared by the members of the church. As a result, a member leads an activity, such as questions or icebreaker games, and then important announcements are made. To conclude, a member chooses a topic and leads the discussion.

“This week I led the discussion and chose to lead a discussion on mental health and how the Bible encourages professional and spiritual help for those who suffer from mental illnesses, and furthermore that they do not. There is no need to be ashamed of mental health issues, ”Chukwusom mentioned.

Along with meetings, ACF is involved in volunteer work, group activities and Bible study. Recently, they went for a hike at Ledges State Park and are considering having a church service. Members can also suggest and plan some of these activities.

It is a new organization with 12 members, including nine students from the state of Iowa, but ACF continues to grow. Members should attend meetings regularly and support the goals of the organization. Anyone can register by visiting the Iowa State Student Organization Page or by sending an email to Chukwusom at jechukwu@iastate.edu.


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Large Churches Across Africa Firmly Oppose LGBTQ Rights | Religion http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/20/large-churches-across-africa-firmly-oppose-lgbtq-rights-religion/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 14:48:00 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/20/large-churches-across-africa-firmly-oppose-lgbtq-rights-religion/ In Ghana, home to a wide range of religions, leaders of major churches have united to denounce homosexuality as a ‘perversion’ and approve legislation that, if passed, would impose some of the harshest anti-LGBTQ policies. from Africa. In Nigeria, the coordinating body of Christian churches describes same-sex relationships as an evil deserving of the long […]]]>

In Ghana, home to a wide range of religions, leaders of major churches have united to denounce homosexuality as a ‘perversion’ and approve legislation that, if passed, would impose some of the harshest anti-LGBTQ policies. from Africa.

In Nigeria, the coordinating body of Christian churches describes same-sex relationships as an evil deserving of the long prison sentences prescribed by current law.

And in several African countries, bishops aligned with the global United Methodist Church are preparing to join an ongoing separatist denomination so they can continue their practice of refusing to recognize same-sex marriage or ordaining LGBTQ clergy.

In the United States, Western Europe and various other regions, some prominent Protestant churches have advocated for the inclusion of LGBTQ. With few exceptions, this has not happened in Africa, where Anglican, Methodist, Presbyterian and Lutheran leaders are among those who oppose such inclusion.

“The traditional churches – all of them – they’re actually totally against it,” said Caroline Omolo, associate pastor with the Cosmopolitan Affirming Community in Nairobi, Kenya. It is a rare example of a church in Africa serving a predominantly LGBTQ congregation.

“They always organized a group to maybe silence us or make the church disappear,” Omolo said. “They don’t want him to appear anywhere.”

Ghana, generally seen as more respectful of human rights than most African countries, is now under scrutiny over a bill in parliament that would impose prison terms ranging from three to 10 years for people who identify as LGBTQ or support this community. The bill has been denounced by human rights activists even as Ghanaian religious leaders rally to it.

“Their role in perpetuating queerphobia and transphobia is clear and it is very disturbing and dangerous,” said Abena Hutchful, a Ghanaian who identifies as queer and co-organized a recent protest against the project. law in New York.

“The bill’s strongest supporters claim to do this in the name of religion,” said Graeme Reid, director of the LGBT rights program at Human Rights Watch. He called the measure “an extremely cruel case study.”

Lawmakers who proposed the bill said they consulted with influential religious leaders when it was drafted. Among those who endorse it are the Christian Council of Ghana, the Ghana Catholic Bishops’ Conference and the country’s chief imam.

“We don’t accept murderers, why should we accept someone who has sex in a sinful way? Archbishop Philip Naameh, president of the bishops’ conference, told The Associated Press. “If you take a position that opposes the production of more children, it is a choice that is detrimental to the existence of the Ghanaian state.”

The Christian Council – whose membership includes Methodist, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Anglican churches – views homosexuality “as an act of perversion and abomination,” according to its general secretary, the Reverend Cyril Fayose of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church.

“Homosexuality is not a human right and we reject it in all uncertain terms,” he said earlier this year.

In Africa’s most populous country, the Christian Association of Nigeria has threatened to sanction any church that shows tolerance for same-sex relationships.

Such acceptance “will never happen,” Methodist Bishop Stephen Adegbite, the association’s director of national affairs, told the AP.

Asked about Nigeria’s law criminalizing same-sex relationships with sentences of up to 14 years in prison, Adegbite said there was no alternative.

“The church can never be compromised,” he said.

Such comments dismay Nigerian LGBTQ activists such as Matthew Blaise, who told the AP he was manhandled by a distraught Catholic priest that Blaise was not heterosexual.

“The church has been awful when it comes to LGBTQ issues, instead of using love as a medium,” Blaise said.

In Nigeria’s commercial capital, Lagos, Catholic Archbishop Alfred Adewale Martins told the AP that Catholic education “recognizes the dignity of every human person”. However, he said LGBTQ people who enter same-sex relationships lead “messy lifestyles” and should change their behavior.

Nigeria is home to one of the United Methodist bishops, John Wesley Yohanna, who says he plans to separate from UMC and join the proposed World Methodist Church. This new denomination, likely to be established next year, is the result of an alliance between Methodists in the United States and abroad who do not support the LGBT inclusion policies favored by many Methodists in the United States. United.

Bishops Samuel J. Quire Jr. of Liberia and Owan Tshibang Kasap of UMC’s southern Congo district have also indicated that they will join the breakaway.

Reverend Keith Boyette, a former United States Methodist who chairs the World Methodist Initiative, said the views of African bishops reflect societal and cultural attitudes widely shared across the continent.

“Homosexual orientation is viewed negatively,” he said. “It is true that a person is of a Christian, Muslim or more indigenous religion.”

In Uganda, where many LGBTQ people remain locked up for fear of violence and arrest, there is a retired Anglican bishop who in 2006 was banned from presiding over religious events because he expressed his empathy with homosexuals.

During decades of ministry with struggling LGBTQ people, Christopher Senyonjo said he has learned that sexuality “is a deep and important part of who we are. We should be free to let people be who they are. are”.

“Ignorance is a big problem in all of this,” Senyonjo told the AP. “When there is ignorance, there is a lot of suffering.”

In 2014, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed a harsh anti-gay law that, in its original version, prescribed the death penalty for certain homosexual acts. Later that year, amid intense international pressure, a judicial panel struck down the legislation over a technicality.

However, a colonial-era law criminalizing sex acts “against the order of nature” remains in place.

Frank Mugisha, a prominent gay activist in Uganda, described religious leaders as “the main drivers of homophobia in Africa”. Some Anglican leaders, he said, have escalated their hostility towards LGBTQ people in an attempt not to lose worshipers to aggressively anti-LGBTQ Pentecostal churches.

Across Africa, only one country, South Africa, has legalized same-sex marriage. Even there, gay and lesbian couples often find it difficult to be accepted by churches, let alone have their marriage celebrated by the clergy.

“People tell me, ‘I grew up in this church, but now I am not accepted,” said Nokuthula Dhladhla, pastor of the Global Interfaith Network, which advocates for LGBTQ rights in the religious sector.

She said some religious leaders privately support same-sex marriage, but are reluctant to do so openly for fear of being sidelined by their more conservative peers.

South African Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu, known worldwide for his opposition to apartheid, has been a strong supporter of LGBTQ rights.

“I wouldn’t worship a homophobic God,” he once said. “I would refuse to go to a homophobic paradise. No, I would say ‘Sorry, I would much rather go to the other place.'”

Caroline Omolo, the activist pastor in Nairobi, said some Kenyan religious leaders blame LGBTQ people for the coronavirus pandemic.

“When we say we always serve God, they don’t see something possible,” she said. “They think it’s something unknown and needs to be stopped.”

However, she said some professors and students at Kenya’s theological schools support her LGBTQ church, which has around 300 members.

“The students, we call them the next generation, the leaders of tomorrow,” she said. “When we have this population on our side, I think there is nothing that can shake us.”


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Would Confirmation of Alien Intelligent Life Cause Crisis for Earth Religion? http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/19/would-confirmation-of-alien-intelligent-life-cause-crisis-for-earth-religion/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 16:17:18 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/19/would-confirmation-of-alien-intelligent-life-cause-crisis-for-earth-religion/ If ET knocked on your door and invited you to an Alien and Terran barbecue, would your religious beliefs face a crisis? Would the religions of the world collapse? My provisional answer is: no! If anything, your appreciation of the magnificence of God’s cosmos would increase. Why might a public theologian be interested in the […]]]>

If ET knocked on your door and invited you to an Alien and Terran barbecue, would your religious beliefs face a crisis? Would the religions of the world collapse? My provisional answer is: no! If anything, your appreciation of the magnificence of God’s cosmos would increase.

Why might a public theologian be interested in the UFO phenomenon? For three reasons. First, UFOs are public. They are experienced everywhere by all kinds of people. Second, like a leaking pipeline flooding us with crude, UFOs flood us with religious symbolism. Third, in the form of UAP (Unidentified Aerospace Phenomena), flying saucers are back in religious, academic and government news. [See: “Astrotheology’s Contribution to Public Theology“]

Parliament of the World’s Religions

On October 17, 2021, the Parliament of the World’s Religions sponsored a workshop titled “The Huge Impact of Alien Contact”. Veteran ufologists – Mark Rodeghier, Jerome Clark, David Cherniak and myself – made up the panel. This event featured a new documentary produced for the CBC by David Cherniak, “UFO: The secret story.”It’s an accurate story worth watching.

ETI at Harvard? Truly?

Yes, singer Demi Lovato is in the news. In the name of political correctness, she complains that the term, “Foreigner” is pejorative to ET. To date, I have not met an extraterrestrial who allegedly claimed to have been discriminated against.

For half a century and more, unidentified aerial phenomena have been studied mainly by benevolent amateurs. CUFO (UAP Study Center) and MUFON (Mutual UFO Network) provided us with the actual X-Files.

What looms on the horizon are new organizations, such as the Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies– composed of scientists who plan to bring instrumental measurements to research. Jensine Andresen and Octavio Chon-Torres are currently editing a new expected book, Extraterrestrial intelligence: academic and social implications. Astroethicists Kelly Smith, Anson Mount and John Traphagen are launching a new research project, “Space exploration, astrobiology and the future of religion”. Academic excitement crosses our intellectual skies like a meteor in August.

harvard astronomer Avi loeb makes the news. He secured funding for high-level research on UAP called the Galileo Project. This includes an investigation of the Extraterrestrial hypothesis (ETH).

U.S. Government Release of UFO / UAP Locator Reports

On June 25, 2021, Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines shared her intelligence regarding UAPs (Unidentified Aerial Phenomena) with the U.S. Congress: Preliminary assessment: Unidentified aerial phenomena. This empty report contains as much water as a dry Arizona arroyo in August. The report reported that the US government has no information regarding mysterious aerospace objects that are seen by pilots or tracked by radar; handicrafts that break tree branches and leave scorched rings in the ground; non-artisanal apparitions of loved ones who have passed away; and bizarre reports from ETI visitors worrying about the threat of nuclear war on Earth and warning that people on earth are on the path to ecocide. Imagine a student assignment that says, “I don’t know anything about this in particular.

How does the head of American intelligence explain such phenomena? Perhaps, the report argues, these NAPs could fall into one of “five potential explanatory categories: air congestion, natural atmospheric phenomena, USG or US industry development programs, foreign adversary systems. and an “other” catch-all bin. “Or, perhaps” a potential adversary [Russia? China?] has developed a revolutionary or disruptive technology ”(US 2021). I do not know, is the bottom row. Nonetheless, the government report concludes, more “funding” is certainly needed.

Should Americans sleep soundly every night knowing that their safety is in the hands of such a smart intelligence? No serious consideration is given in this report to the Secret Technology Theory or the Alien Hypothesis (ETH). Let’s turn to ETH (Peters, Are UFOs Secret Technology or God’s Chariots? 2021).

Ask different questions

My answer here is not to try to fill this blank report with UFO information. I’d rather ask a different question: What would be the impact on religious belief systems if we Earthlings woke up one morning and found ourselves in the company of extraterrestrial neighbors?

Mockers, journalists and some scientists deplore that the Earth religion would collapse under the weight of confirmed knowledge of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). Because Christianity and most religious traditions formulated their key beliefs in an old worldview that is now outdated, shocking new knowledge would be dislodge our pre-modern dogmas? Are Earth-centered Christians, so that contact with ETI decentralizes and marginalizes our self-esteem? Make our traditional religions we put human beings at the top of the hierarchy of life, so that if we come across mid-sized companies who are smarter than us, will we lose our top rank? If we are created in the image of God, will we need to share this divine image with our new neighbors in space? In short, the confirmation of the existence of ETI causes collapse of earthly belief systems? What if earthly religious belief systems collapse, will theologians find themselves out of work?

To answer these questions, let’s look at some data and then look at some theology. First, the data. With the help of a former student assistant, Julie Froehlig, I directed The Peters ETI survey on the religious crisis. That is, I asked people about their faith. It’s a good source of data, isn’t it?

Question 3 of the survey is very informative. Here it is: “The official confirmation of the discovery of a civilization of intelligent beings living on another planet would undermine my beliefs so much that my beliefs would face a crisis. Almost no one checked Agree or Strongly agree. Over 90% of the responses disagree or strongly disagree. This is the case for Evangelical Christians, Fundamentalist Christians, Roman Catholics, Mainline Protestants, as well as self-identified Buddhists, Mormons and non-religious. In sum, believers in all the religious traditions tested claim an integration of new knowledge regarding ETI (Peters 2008) (Peters, The implications of the discovery of extraterrestrial life for religion 2011).

Astrophysicists speak

Enter: astrotheology. Astrotheology is that branch of theology which provides a critical analysis of contemporary space science combined with an explanation of classical doctrines such as creation and Christology with the aim of building a complete and meaningful understanding of our human situation in a surprisingly immense cosmos (Peters , Introducing Astrotheology 2018, 11-12).

Here is an astrotheologian worthy of attention: David Wilkinson. Wilkinson is a Methodist astronomer and theologian.

Wilkenson does not believe Earth is visited by aliens piloting flying saucers. Still, he supports SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) and other scientific work in the hopes of meeting new friends living on exoplanets. This is important for Christians, he said, because we must appreciate how vast God’s creation is. “Human beings are not the center of the universe. In fact, it is the human belief that we are the center of all things that the Bible calls sin … God is the center of all things, and we are creatures endowed with status through his love ”(Wilkinson 2013, 148 ). By decentring on Earth, we can better appreciate our humble place in the beautiful cosmos of God.

But, aren’t aliens sent here by Satan? These friends of yours who tell you this are very few. If they’re harassing you, tell them to back off. But of course with “gentleness and respect” (1 Peter 3:15) (Peters, Reasons for the Hope Christians Have 2021).

One incarnation or several?

In a future Patheos column, I hope to address a thorny question: if outer space is populated by races of intelligent beings, would each extraterrestrial civilization justify its own Christ incarnation or the incarnation of Jesus on Earth would suffice? it to the cosmos? Think about your answer. Then read a future article on “One incarnation or several?

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Ted Peters (Ph.D., University of Chicago) leads traffic at the intersection of science, religion and ethics. Peters is Professor Emeritus at the Graduate Theological Union, where he co-edits the journal, Theology and sciences, on behalf of the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences, Berkeley, California, USA. With Martinez Hewlett, Joshua Moritz and Robert John Russell, he co-edited, Astrotheology: science and theology meet extraterrestrial intelligence (2018). With Octavio Chon Torres, Joseph Seckbach and Russell Gordon, he co-edited, Astrobiology: science, ethics and public policies (Scriver 2021). He is also author of UFO: the chariots of God? Spirituality, Ancient Aliens, and Religious Aspirations in the Age of Aliens (Career Press New Page Books, 2014). See his website: TedsTimelyTake.com.

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RESOURCES

Peters, Ted. 2021. Are UFOs Secret Technology Or ​​God’s Chariots? Online, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/rogereolson/2021/05/guest-post-are-ufos-secret-technology-or-gods-chariots/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=BRSS&utm_campaign=Evangelical&utm_content=259: Roger Olson’s Patheos blog.

Peters, Ted. 2021. Reasons for the Hope Christians Have. Online, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/rogereolson/2021/06/guest-post-by-ted-peters-reasons-for-the-hope-christians-have/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=BRSS&utm_campaign= Evangelical & utm_content = 259: Roger Olson’s Patheos Blog.

Peters, Ted. 2011. “The implications of the discovery of extraterrestrial life for religion.The Royal Society: Philosophical Transactions A 369: 644-655; https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.72/kht.6bb.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2011RoyalSoc.pdf.

Peters, Ted. 2008. The Peters ETI survey on the religious crisis. https://counterbalance.org/etsurv/PetersETISurveyRep.pdf, Seattle: Counterweight.

Peters, Ted, 2018. “Introducing Astrotheology.” Astrotheology: science and theology meet extraterrestrial life, eds, Ted Peters, Martinez Hewlett, Joshua W. Moritz and Robert John Russell. Eugène OR: Cascade.

United States, Office of the Director of National Intelligence. 2021. Preliminary assessment L Unidentified aerial phenomena. https://www.dni.gov/files/ODNI/documents/assessments/Prelimary-Assessment-UAP-20210625.pdf, Washington DC: US ​​Government Printing Office.

Wilkinson, David. 2013. Science, religion and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Oxford: Oxford University Press.



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Give us more: DePaul demands religion but lacks interreligious courses, several religions are not represented in the courses http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/18/give-us-more-depaul-demands-religion-but-lacks-interreligious-courses-several-religions-are-not-represented-in-the-courses/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 03:46:36 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/18/give-us-more-depaul-demands-religion-but-lacks-interreligious-courses-several-religions-are-not-represented-in-the-courses/ Finding a course in religion is not difficult – there are 158 courses that count towards the general requirement for religion courses in DePaul. But, of these 158 options for compulsory courses, there are only three courses oriented towards Hinduism, seven for Buddhism, seven for general Christianity and none for interfaith. Some may argue that […]]]>

Finding a course in religion is not difficult – there are 158 courses that count towards the general requirement for religion courses in DePaul. But, of these 158 options for compulsory courses, there are only three courses oriented towards Hinduism, seven for Buddhism, seven for general Christianity and none for interfaith.

Some may argue that there are courses for religions like God Debates or Religion and Culture in America, but none of the options presented in the course registration to discuss how to respect people who practice their religion or how to discuss religion with respect. For all of these students, it will be more of a lecture on different types of religion than a discussion experience where students can learn about different religions through their peers.

Freshman Ethan Siebel thinks religion classes shouldn’t be a requirement. He said that if the requirement for the religion course persists, he would like different courses to be offered.

“I like the concept of offering a course on religious tolerance [or] interfaith as an alternative to the current religion course credit requirement, ”said Siebel. “I also think a course on spirituality and its mental health benefits might be a good alternative course to meet the religion credit requirement.”

Second-year student Liz Bazzoli said a tolerance class would be a subjective type of class, not providing much benefit other than surface level.

“I think there should obviously be [an] an all-inclusive education spanning multiple religions, but I also think “tolerance” is an easily problematic trap to fall into, ”Bazzoli said. “Religion is a deeply personal and individualistic practice, and I think it’s easy to generalize what Hinduism or Judaism is, for example. By simply teaching religious texts or basic beliefs, you run the risk of erasing the nuance of religious belief and practice and almost dehumanizing it in some way, so I think that’s a fine line. to browse. Just being “tolerant” doesn’t really respect religion. “

Freshman Nickolas Kreuger agrees with the concept of having a class that delves into different religions. He said, “I think [it] it would be cool to have an interfaith course but I think it would be better used as a module like the alcohol modules [used in explore and discover classes]. “

Religion classes should not be a requirement at DePaul, despite the school’s identity as a Catholic university. DePaul students who are of a different religion should have an equal number of classes available to them so that they can have the opportunity to enter a class that they align best with rather than being forced to ‘go to a Catholic-based class as a safeguard. There should at least be an optional interfaith course for students who enroll in their courses later than most.

“I really don’t think so [religion classes] should be [required]”said Krueger.” I can understand why [there is a requirement], but when you are that age, you have already been raised in a certain way or you have your own values. If you’ve wanted to find a new religion or whatever, you’ve already done your research. There are only a number of enlightenment stories of people being forced to take a course and then falling in love. “

In addition, according to the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, to be classified as a Catholic university or college, the school must be faithful to tradition, must have Christian values, vision and goals, must be committed to service. and must reflect Christianity. Faith. Nowhere in the requirements is it necessary for students to attend or pass a religion course, so DePaul would not be negatively affected as an institution by removing this requirement from the school.

If anything, DePaul would benefit from this program change. Those who do not practice religion would feel more comfortable with DePaul instead of feeling pressured into engaging in religion through a compulsory course. Students who have a specific religious belief should be offered more courses related to their religious affiliation.

Those interested in religious studies should have more unique courses available if they wish to explore different religions, academically or spiritually. Those who follow a religion other than Christianity may feel more represented in DePaul if these courses are implemented. But if there isn’t a more inclusive range of courses about different religions, DePaul shouldn’t force students to take religion courses.


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2023: No tribe or religion can monopolize the leadership of Nigeria – Tambuwal http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/16/2023-no-tribe-or-religion-can-monopolize-the-leadership-of-nigeria-tambuwal/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:15:32 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/16/2023-no-tribe-or-religion-can-monopolize-the-leadership-of-nigeria-tambuwal/ Governor Aminu Tambuwal of Sokoto State has said that no group of people of a particular tribe or religion can claim control of the Nigerian rulers. He said so on Friday when he received the national president of the Christian Association of Nigeria, CAN, Rev. Ayokunle Samson Olasupo, in Sokoto state. The governor said that […]]]>

Governor Aminu Tambuwal of Sokoto State has said that no group of people of a particular tribe or religion can claim control of the Nigerian rulers.

He said so on Friday when he received the national president of the Christian Association of Nigeria, CAN, Rev. Ayokunle Samson Olasupo, in Sokoto state.

The governor said that no one can arrogate to himself the leadership of Nigeria to the exclusion of the other peoples of the country.

Tambuwal said: “The country’s leadership is mutually complementary as Nigeria belongs to every Nigerian, and no one will send anyone out of the country, hence the need to stay together for the betterment of the country.

“The kind of leadership the country needs is one that understands diversity issues and is inclusive in its approach to governance, without tribal or religious sentiments.

“Islam and Christianity coexisted even before the country’s union existed. Those who know the history have said that Christianity and Islam belong to the same root. Jerusalem and Damascus are examples of places where the two religions are practiced side by side. “

Naija News reports that as the 2023 general election approaches, different groups have called for the presidency to be transferred to a particular region of the country.

North and south are currently scrambling to find out who will succeed President Muhammadu Buhari.


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Charities must pay tariffs because of their goals of “promoting religion” http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/15/charities-must-pay-tariffs-because-of-their-goals-of-promoting-religion/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 14:31:52 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/15/charities-must-pay-tariffs-because-of-their-goals-of-promoting-religion/ An evangelical Christian charity helping to reduce poverty in developing countries must pay its annual bill of € 4,000 in Dublin, the High Court has ruled. Since one of the charity’s goals is “the advancement of religion,” it is not entitled to an exemption from these rates, the High Court ruled. Tearfund Ireland Ltd is […]]]>

An evangelical Christian charity helping to reduce poverty in developing countries must pay its annual bill of € 4,000 in Dublin, the High Court has ruled.

Since one of the charity’s goals is “the advancement of religion,” it is not entitled to an exemption from these rates, the High Court ruled.

Tearfund Ireland Ltd is a faith-based organization with offices at Ulysses House, Foley Street.

It is a registered charity and part of its stated purpose is that anyone working for it in poverty reduction must accept the Bible as the authoritative word of God and “wants to introduce the people they serve to.” that fullness of life that comes through faith in Jesus Christ alone ”.

In 2019, an appraisal tribunal ruled that it was rate exempt as a charity.

The valuation commissioner, whose role, under the aegis of the Ministry of Housing, Local Government and Heritage, is to independently assess all commercial and industrial properties in the country, was unhappy with the decision.

Accordingly, the High Court was asked to determine whether the Oireachtas understood the meaning of “charitable purposes” to include “the advancement of religion”.

The Commissioner argued, inter alia, that since 1914 Irish courts have consistently held, when interpreting charitable valuation laws, that this does not include the advancement of religion.

The exclusion of the advancement of religion from the definition of “charitable purposes” was in keeping with the intention of assessment law in general that all taxpayers should bear the burden fairly and equally, he said. -on also supported.

Tearfund argued that the 2001 Assessment Act had new provisions for properties that were to be exempt and had abolished the previous provisions, which meant that much of the earlier case law was no longer relevant.

It has also been argued that there has been a broad definition of “charitable purpose” for 130 years.

Judge Robert Barr ruled against the Valuation Tribunal, stating that it was not correct in law to consider that the meaning the Oireachtas intended to give to charitable purposes under the 2001 Act included “the advancement of religion ”.

The Tribunal also erred in concluding that the promotion of religion was a charitable purpose for the purposes of the 2001 Act.

In a separate judgment this week, the judge ruled that both parties should pay their own costs.

He was satisfied that there was sufficient public interest in the outcome of the appeal to make it fair for each party to bear its own costs.


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Faith helps a local man overcome his addiction | Religion http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/12/faith-helps-a-local-man-overcome-his-addiction-religion/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 16:45:00 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/12/faith-helps-a-local-man-overcome-his-addiction-religion/ NORTH CAPE MAY – Bullying, Anxiety, peer pressure and family dynamics have built up in Ricky Gentek’s soul over time. From his home, Gentek, 30, shared his story of addiction, faith and recovery via Zoom on October 8. “It’s a blessing to see how great God is and how small I am,” he said. “I’ve […]]]>

NORTH CAPE MAY – Bullying, Anxiety, peer pressure and family dynamics have built up in Ricky Gentek’s soul over time. From his home, Gentek, 30, shared his story of addiction, faith and recovery via Zoom on October 8.

“It’s a blessing to see how great God is and how small I am,” he said.

“I’ve lived here my whole life,” Gentek said, referring to Cape May County.

At 3, his parents divorced. Gentek LiveD with her mother, who moved to Middle Township.

“I saw my dad on the weekends,” he explained.

Learning difficulties also rocked his childhood. Gentek said he was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) when he was in third grade.

“Everything was such a challenge,” he said.

“I hated how the drug made me feel, but I took it every day,” he added.

The biggest burden, according to Gentek, was realizing that he was not “like everyone else.”

Music has become a lifeline, according to Gentek. He attributes his passion for the guitar and orchestral playing to his father, but the music could not silence the noise in Gentek’s soul.

During his sophomore year of high school, Gentek began to “self-medicate” and experiment with drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and LSD.

The “full-fledged party” also provided a temporary escape, according to Gentek.

By the time he reached his final year, Gentek knew something had to change. He described desire as a “mixed motivation”: Wanting to quit without wanting to be sober.

“My family was at their wit’s end,” he said.

After going to rehab, Gentek said his father invited him to a local Bible study in 2012.

“What the hell am I doing here?” Gentek said, remembering his thoughts at the time.

During the Bible study he met a man named Nick, who told Gentek about The American Keswick, in Whiting, a non-denominational Christian conference and retreat center based on the original, In Great Britain. Keswick also offers a drug recovery center for men and women.

Gentek applied but heroin overdose. He found refuge with his father, who helped him through withdrawals. However, Gentek was arrested and housed in the Cape May County Correctional Facility on the eve of Storm Sandy.

“I tried to pray,” Gentek said, noting that he felt “safe” in prison, away from the world, and his incarceration became a metaphor.

“I was not a believer at the time,” he said.

After two weeks in prison, Gentek left for Keswick and enrolled in the four-month program. He stayed for three more months.

“I gave my life to Christ,” he said.

Jesus’ intellectual understanding became personal when he asked Jesus to forgive and save him.

Gentek’s journey of recovery continued after leaving Keswick.

He couch-surfed for a while with friends while doing odd jobs.

He wants others to realize their need for a savior, and this restoration is not separate from faith.

Today Gentek works as a professional painter and attends Revolve Church. He still enjoys music and playing the guitar.

Gentek also speaks occasionally at Coastal Preparatory High School at Cape Assist, sharing his journey with students on the road to recovery.

“You are more blessed than you think,” he concluded.

Faith Matters is an ongoing series exploring the connection between individuals and their faith, impacting their families, community and beyond. Those who have a history of faith into shareshouldcontactthewriterTorrogish@cmcherald.com.


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Debate on ethics and religion: violence and religious proselytism http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/11/debate-on-ethics-and-religion-violence-and-religious-proselytism/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 20:09:16 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/11/debate-on-ethics-and-religion-violence-and-religious-proselytism/ Fred Stella, the Pracharak (Minister of Outreach) of the West Michigan Hindu Temple, responds: In 2005, I undertook a speaking (and listening) tour in 4 states of India with a strong Christian majority. Many of these expressions of Christianity were fundamentalist / Pentecostal. While there is no doubt that some people have converted from honest […]]]>

Fred Stella, the Pracharak (Minister of Outreach) of the West Michigan Hindu Temple, responds:

In 2005, I undertook a speaking (and listening) tour in 4 states of India with a strong Christian majority. Many of these expressions of Christianity were fundamentalist / Pentecostal. While there is no doubt that some people have converted from honest religious experience, I have learned that many efforts of evangelical organizations are duplicity and unethical. Yes, this colonialist mindset of “saving” the poor black people of India inspired the violence. An important element of my lectures focused on meeting this Western juggernaut with a Gandhian sense of peaceful resistance. This conflict will not be resolved by burning churches or attacking missionaries. But I understand the frustration that inspires some of the heinous acts committed in response.

Groups like Mission India of Grand Rapids used very offensive language to promote their message of salvation. They describe Hinduism as a religion completely devoid of charity, compassion or a sense of duty. And it’s important to note that the World Council of Churches condemned these brutal practices. Having said that, I understand that asking an evangelical Christian to refrain from attempts at conversion is like asking a Muslim not to fast during Ramadan. It is an integral part of their faith. But I hope that one day all missionary organizations will follow the appropriate guidelines set out by the WCC.

Reverend Steven W. Manskar, a retired United Methodist pastor, responds:

Ending the practice can reduce religious violence. But is it possible? All religions and political ideologies have groups within them who are convinced that theirs is the only true faith and that all others are false. This arrogance leads people to hate and believe that God hates whom they hate. If their god hates whom they hate, then unbelievers should be proselytes. Violence against those who do not comply often follows. Those who commit violence believe they are acting with God’s blessing.

Proselytism is violence. It is an act of pride rather than love. Pride is a disorderly faith that centers on the believer’s trust in his knowledge of the will of God. It is the mistaken belief that their religion is the only bearer of truth and that others cannot be true and worthy of honor and respect either. It is not to honor people created in the image of God, worthy of respect and dignity. Proselytizing reduces people to things to be conquered.

In other words, proselytizing is a sin. Sin is an unhappy reality of the human condition. Love is the cure for this condition. Love does not proselytize. Love invites, accompanies and shares directly with the loved one.

Linda Knieriemen, senior pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Holland, replies:

First, I understand a difference between “proselytizing” and “evangelizing” or sharing the faith. If proselytizing includes coercion or forced conversation, violence is more likely to come into play. A bigger cause of religious violence, I believe, results from fanaticism and extremism. The risk of inter-religious violence decreases increasing dialogue allowing for growth in understanding, mutual respect and peace.

Father Kevin Niehoff, OP, a Dominican priest who serves as judicial vicar, Diocese of Grand Rapids, responds:

Without an exact reference to the article in the question (an Internet search using the above information provided no help), it is difficult to answer a “general” question. Therefore, the word “proselytizing” in the question is a forced conversion to a specific religious tradition. There are other meanings of ‘proselytizing!’

In the tradition of the Roman Catholic faith, a sincere conversion consists of two elements that work in unison. First, the individual must show humility in recognizing the presence of sin in his own life. The humble acceptance of sin necessarily brings about the second element, which is the realization that God is merciful in forgiving sins. Only this will lead to a real change of heart.

How to stop the practice of religious proselytism is the crux of the matter? The United Nations has created a document called, Action plan for religious leaders and actors to prevent incitement to violence that could lead to atrocious crimes. Changing the hearts of human beings is the only way to reduce religious violence.

My answer:

I will rely on my colleague Fred Stella’s report that aggressive proselytizing led to violence. However, I am not convinced that this is the main source of violence. It seems to me that the majority of religious violence in the world is rooted in the idea that you are from the wrong ethnic tribe or that you are not indigenous to that region and my sense of religiosity therefore believes that I have the right to expel you by force. It is not clear that the ultimate goal is conversion. Another significant part of religious violence is committed against women whose practice does not match that of religious leaders. They are not asked to convert in themselves, but to adhere to a narrower and more restrictive definition of the religion to which they are already affiliated.

This column answers questions of ethics and religion by submitting them to a multi-faith panel of spiritual leaders in the Grand Rapids area. We would love to hear about the ordinary ethical questions that arise during your day as well as any religious questions that you have. Tell us how you solved an ethical dilemma and see how the members of the Ethics and Religion panel would have handled the same situation. Please send your questions to [email protected].

The Rapidian, a program of the association 501 (c) 3 Community media center, relies on community support to help cover the costs of training journalists and publishing content.

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If each of our readers and content creators who enjoy this community platform help support its creation and maintenance, The Rapidian can continue to educate and facilitate a conversation around issues for years to come.

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RELIGION: Evangelization: a Christian vocation | Chroniclers http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/10/religion-evangelization-a-christian-vocation-chroniclers/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/10/religion-evangelization-a-christian-vocation-chroniclers/ Evangelism. What comes to your mind when you hear the word evangelism? Maybe, a street preacher, a big stadium revival, or names like Billy Sunday, DL Moody, or the great Billy Graham. Mr. Kimball’s name will not cause memories of great revivals, but Mr. Kimball in 1858 brought a shoe salesman to Christ. That clerk […]]]>

Evangelism. What comes to your mind when you hear the word evangelism? Maybe, a street preacher, a big stadium revival, or names like Billy Sunday, DL Moody, or the great Billy Graham.

Mr. Kimball’s name will not cause memories of great revivals, but Mr. Kimball in 1858 brought a shoe salesman to Christ. That clerk was Dwight L. Moody. Through Moody’s evangelistic work, Fredrick B. Meyer, a pastor, preaching to a group of students brought Wilbur Chapman to Christ, who in turn led Billy Sunday to evangelism. When Sunday preached a revival in Charlotte, NC, a group of local men were so enthusiastic afterwards that they planned another evangelistic campaign, bringing Mordecai Hamm to town to preach. While Hamm was awakening, a young man named Billy Graham heard the gospel and gave his life to Christ. What a tremendous impact a Sunday School teacher has had on the kingdom of God. Hundreds of millions of people have been reached for Christ through the ministry of Billy Graham. This is the definition of evangelism. Ordinary people sharing Christ and then God doing the supernatural.

So why are we as Christians so hesitant to share Christ’s wonderful message? Only the sheer rapture of being lost in the worship of God can compare to the feeling of the Holy Spirit flowing through you when you tell someone about Jesus Christ. But yet it elicits so much anxiety and fearful reactions on the part of those who have been called to spread the glorious message of Christ. We do not have to be afraid: “Thus will be my word which comes out of my mouth; He will not come back to Me empty, Without accomplishing what I desire, And without succeeding in the matter for which I sent him. (Isaiah (55:11) I am convinced that the reason we fail to share Christ fearlessly is that we do not discipline ourselves to do so.

Evangelism is expected. The Lord Jesus himself commanded us to bear witness. (Matt. 28: 19-20) “Go and make disciples” (Mark 16:15) “Go and share the gospel. “(John 20:21)” Jesus said I send you. “(Acts 1: 8)” You will receive power; you will be my witnesses. Could the Word of God be clearer? The Gospel of Christ has traveled for 2000 years and has come to you. It wasn’t supposed to end with you and me. “The gospel came to you because it was headed for someone else. God never intended your salvation to be an end, but a beginning, ”said Robby Gallaty.

God called us each to share his message. It is not an option. Personal evangelism is a responsibility. Many know 1 Peter 2: 9 but if we read the whole verse it says “so that you may proclaim the excellences of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light”; How wonderful that we have been called to help someone else out of the darkness. Go ahead and let God bring the harvest.

Eddie Turner has a Masters in Christian Ministry and a Bachelor of Science in Religion / Christian Counseling. He is retired and a member of the Norwood Heights Baptist Church in Palestine.


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on religion | The Gospel According to a Dead Bishop – Times-Standard http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/09/on-religion-the-gospel-according-to-a-dead-bishop-times-standard/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 10:38:35 +0000 http://www.hardypresbyterian.com/2021/10/09/on-religion-the-gospel-according-to-a-dead-bishop-times-standard/ Bishop John Shelby Spong of Newark, New Jersey, never pasted “Why Christianity Must Change or Die” on the doors of Canterbury Cathedral because it was easier to post a version of his manifesto on the Internet. “Theism, as a way of defining God, is dead,” he proclaimed in 1998. “As God can no longer be […]]]>

Bishop John Shelby Spong of Newark, New Jersey, never pasted “Why Christianity Must Change or Die” on the doors of Canterbury Cathedral because it was easier to post a version of his manifesto on the Internet.

“Theism, as a way of defining God, is dead,” he proclaimed in 1998. “As God can no longer be conceived in theistic terms, it becomes absurd to seek to understand Jesus as the incarnation of the theistic divinity. “

In the absence of a personal God, it was logical to add: “Prayer cannot be a request made to a theistic deity to act in human history in a particular way.

Spong’s 12 point view on post-theism faith emerged after spending years on the road, giving hundreds of speeches and appearing on shows such as “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “Larry King Live”. While leading the Episcopal Diocese of Newark, within earshot of New York City, he did all he could to become the media face of liberal Christianity.

By the time of his death at the age of 90 – on September 12 at his home in Richmond, Virginia – Spong had seen many of his once heretical beliefs – particularly about sex and marriage – normalized in most of the world. chairs and episcopal institutions. However, his doctrinal approach was too blunt for many in the mainstream establishment, where a calmer “spiritual but not religious” approach became the norm.

Spong called himself a “doubtful believer” and said he had no problem reciting traditional rites and beliefs because in his own mind he had already redefined words and pictures to suit his purposes. own doctrines. He also knew when to be careful, such as on a visit to Denver in the late 1980s – a time when the Colorado diocese remained a center for evangelical and charismatic Episcopalians.

After a talk at St. Thomas Liberal Episcopal Church, I asked Spong if he believed Jesus’ resurrection to be a “historic event that took place in real time.”

“I don’t think I can say what the disciples thought I went through. I’m going to have to think about it a bit more, ”he said, moving on to another question.

The bishop responded a decade later, in his note calling for a new Reformation: “The resurrection is an act of God. Jesus was brought up in the sense of God. It cannot therefore be a physical resuscitation occurring within human history.

Frequently, Spong floated doctrinal test balloons in The Voice, his diocesan journal. Here are some other famous quotes.

• On the Scriptures: “The Gospels describe Jesus as believing that David wrote the Psalms, Solomon the Proverbs, and Moses the Torah – a position that any graduate of any accredited seminary today would quickly reject.

• On the Virgin Mary: “The Mary that I see in the history of the church is a woman without sex. … Her humanity has been taken away from her, and I think (Mary) is a very bad symbol.

• On science: “We have applied our enormous scientific and technical skills to open doors to aspects of life that we once attributed only to the gods. … The power of divinity is increasingly our own power.

Spong argued that churches that did not embrace modernity were doomed to failure. Nonetheless, in his day, members of the Episcopal Church grew from 3.4 million in the 1960s to 1.6 million in 2019, according to official statistics. During Spong’s tenure as bishop (1976-2000), the membership of the Diocese of Newark increased from 62,732 to 36,674. That number had fallen to 23,045 by 2019.

Spong was not disturbed.

“When Jesus said:“ Come to me all of you ”, he did not add:“ as long as you are not divorced or homosexual or a female bishop or a skeptic ””, a- he writes. “This church of ours may never be the church of the masses; it will never meet the emotional needs of religiously insecure people.

Speaking at Drew Theological School in New Jersey, the bishop also urged believers not to worry about eternity.

“No one knows what the afterlife is; no one even knows if there is one, “Spong said in 2010.” All these images of happiness and punishment, of heaven and hell, are not about the Hereafter at all. It is about controlling human behavior with fear and guilt. …

“We don’t need a savior. If Jesus died for your sins, you are a miserable human being. I don’t think this is good news.

Terry Mattingly runs GetReligion.org and lives in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He is a principal investigator at the Overby Center at the University of Mississippi.


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